About

AP-Gateway to Climate and Development

Climate change is an urgent issue that requires global participation. The IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) provides critical information on current climatic condition, impact assessments, and the relationship between various mitigation paths and future GHG concentration scenarios. Based on its understanding, it is increasingly clear that we need to take concrete and immediate actions to minimize the impacts of future climate change. Also, at the COP13 of the UNFCCC held December 2007 in Bali, Indonesia, Parties agreed on “the Bali Action Plan”, which confirms that all countries, both developed and developing, need to make efforts to tackle climate change. As developing countries’ priority is development, it is necessary to integrate mitigation and adaptation into national development policies and plans, in order to address climate change.
Asia-Pacific Gateway to Climate and Development is a platform to assist countries to make concrete efforts to address climate and development. The AP Gateway to Climate and Development captures two focal areas; Co-benefits Approach (mitigation) and Integrating Adaptation into Development.

Knowledge Pool

AP-Gateway provides you to useful information and/or tools to promote your Co-benefits activities.

Implementation Manual

Catalogue for Identification of Co-benefits Projects to GHG Reduction and Local Environmental Improvement

  • Water: Co-benefit-based climate change countermeasures and CDM in the water treatment field
  • Air: Co-benefit-based climate change countermeasures and CDM in the air pollution field
  • Waste: Co-benefit-based climate change countermeasures and CDM in the waste management field

Quantifiable evaluation methodolgies

Coming soon

Other key info

The Ministry of the Envrionment, Japan (MOEJ) and Overseas Environmental Cooperation Center, Japan (OECC) released brochures of Co-benefits Approach.

  • Co-benefit Approach Addressing Local and Global Environmental Issues through Working on Climate Change Mitigation and CDM Developing Countries (December 2007)[Download (PDF: 2.4MB)]
  • Co-benefit Approach Development Needs-oriented Efforts Address Climate Change and CDM. (May 2007) [Download (PDF: 6.4MB)]

Transport

Metro Manila Transport Project
The Metro Manila Traffic Improvement Project by the Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC) helped the Manila capital region increase the mobility of passengers and raise logistics efficiency, which are vital for economic development of the region. The project demonstrated a positive impact of mitigating traffic congestion, and reducing air pollution substances such as Sox and NOx, as well as CO2 which is a major contributors of climate change.
A series of yen loan projects consisted of 10 sub-projects including Metro Manila Traffic Control Projects and Road Construction Projects. JBIC’s assistance for constructing roads, two-level crossing roads, and Light Rail Transit (LRT) upgraded region’s economic infrastructure, and the same time, by introducing traffic and air quality monitoring system, it significantly strengthened capacity to protect environmental condition by the local authorities.

Benefits GHG Mitigation Reduction of GHG emissions(4.2%)
Transport Increasing mobility of passengers / Mitigating traffic congestion
Others Reduction of Sox (3%) and NOx (0.6%)
Source: Yen Loan Post Evaluation Report 2001

Waste Management 2

Many developing countries face increasingly serious waste management challenges, especially at the local government level. Taking countermeasures to reduce the amount of waste may also provide opportunities to reduce GHG emissions.Many developing countries face increasingly serious waste management challenges, especially at the local government level. Taking countermeasures to reduce the amount of waste may also provide opportunities to reduce GHG emissions.
Kolkata Solid Waste Management Improvement Project
This waste management project in India is promoting appropriate municipal solid waste management by developing a management system, including segregation, collection, and raising awareness of the 3R (reduce, reuse and recycle) concept. As a result, the project effectively reduces the amount of waste and improves sanitary conditions as well as CH4 emissions from landfill.

Project cost 4,239 million yen (Loan amount 3,584 million yen)
Project term February 2006-November 2010 (58months) / project life 16years
Benefits GHG Mitigation N/A
Waste Management Baseline (2004) 94,000t/year >>> After completion (2011) 64,000t/year
Compost plant input 20,000t/year
Others Reduction of BOD / Improvement of waste collection
Loan agreement on 31 March 2006
Source: Ex-ante evaluation

Waste Management

Many developing countries face increasingly serious waste management challenges, especially at the local government level. Taking countermeasures to reduce the amount of waste may also provide opportunities to reduce GHG emissions. Many developing countries face increasingly serious waste management challenges, especially at the local government level. Taking countermeasures to reduce the amount of waste may also provide opportunities to reduce GHG emissions.
Co-composting of EFB and POME
The composting project in Malaysia will reduce the dumping of organic waste at a landfill which causes CH4 emissions. By utilizing empty fruits bunch (EFB) and palm oil mill effluent (POME) to produce compost, the project will deliver the multiple benefits of reducing waste, water pollution, and CH4 emissions.

Project cost N/A (CDM EB registration fee USD 4590.0)
Project term 21years starting in January 2006 / Crediting period 7years
(September 2007- August 2014)
Benefits GHG Mitigation 30,000tCO2/year / Total estimated reduction 213,148tCO2e
Waste Management Baseline (2007) EFB 48,000t/year / POME 75,000t/year
>>> Compost produced 14,000t/year
Others Reduction of COD
As of 06 August 2007
Source: Project Design Document (PDD)

What is Co-benefits Approch to GHG Reduction?

The co-benefits approach to climate change and CDM means integrated efforts to address climate change concerns, while meeting development needs in developing countries. The co-benefits approach helps developing countries increase their ownership while engaging in efforts to address climate change, by introducing measures to achieve tangible development benefits. It is also considered to be a practical approach for developed countries to cooperate with developing countries, where economic and social development is a priority at the national and local levels.

The Ministry of the Environment, Japan (MOEJ) and the Overseas Environmental Cooperation Center, Japan (OECC) jointly launched an initiative on “Co-benefits Approach – Development Needs-oriented Efforts to Address Climate Change and CDM” in 2006.”

This website cotains useful information regarding to co-benefits activities, such as good practices, manuals, tools, links and etc.

Duplicating Areas of Action for Development and Climate Change